Love Potion: The chemical concoction that love induces in the human body

7757

Happy Valentine’s Day! For many of us today is a day to celebrate the love we share with our partners – and for some others it’s the ideal time of year to complain about not having one. Nonetheless, independently of your current status – the chemical effects that love has on our bodies is undeniable. Scientists have proven that love deeply affects us physically and that when we do find it, it feels oh so good.

Researchers have spent time analysing the increase of chemicals that are released in the brain when we fall in love. Dopamine plays a large role in the overwhelming feeling of “not being able to get enough” of another person. This chemical controls the level of pleasure we feel and is normally associated with more negative addictions such as drug use or gambling. When we find our significant other and dopamine levels increase, a couple will feel enamoured and revitalised. This sensation is arguably the feeling of become quite literally addicted to the one another. Helen Fisher, PhD explained to Health.com Read more

Scientists create the first 3-D bioprinter capable of printing fully functioning skin

Keyboard with a key to start 3-D printing

A group of ground-breaking scientists from Spain joined forces and created a prototype for the first 3-D bioprinter that has the capability of producing fully functioning skin.

This new technology is a result of a joint collaboration between a team of researchers from Carlos III University (UC3M), Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, CIEMAT (Center for Energy, Environmental and Technological Research) and the firm BioDan Group. Their bioprinter produces fully functioning skin that is adequate for not only cosmetic, chemical and pharmaceutical testing but also skin transplants.  Luis Jorcano, professor in UC3M's department of Bioengineering and Aerospace Engineering and head of the Mixed Unit CIEMAT/UC3M in Biomedical Engineering, explained to scientific journal Biofabrication that the skin "can be transplanted to patients or used in business settings to test chemical Read more

The Amygdala: The connection between stress and heart disease

Artistic picture of a stethoscope and a foam heart

A recent study conducted by Harvard Medical School and published by UK medical journal The Lancet suggests that the effect of constant stress on a deep-lying region of the brain could potentially explain the link between the risk of heart attack and stress.[1]

Experts and scientific studies coincide that emotional stress can have a serious negative effect on the increase risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Stress affects the body in many ways, one of which being directly affecting the heart and blood vessels. Some experts even believe that emotional stress can be just as dangerous a risk factor as smoking and high blood pressure.[2] Medical professionals have had little understanding until now about the link between stress, the brain and heart disease. However, this recent study, conducted by Harvard Medical School, suggests that the effect stress has on the amygdala section of the brain Read more