Women suffering heart attacks more likely to be misdiagnosed


We tend to think that people who suffer heart attacks are middle aged, overweight men, but it’s something that can happen to anyone. In many cases, the symptoms of a heart attack remain unrecognized and study shows that 30% of people were misdiagnosed, of which most were women.

Researchers from the University of Leeds studied 600,000 heart attack patients over nine years, revealing the abovementioned worrying number. It seems that the source of this problem is the lack of education and awareness among the public, but also among doctors. Women don’t recognize they are having a heart attack and go to their GP instead of A&E directly, resulting in a late diagnosis. Heart attack A heart attack occurs when the oxygen-rich blood flow to our heart muscle gets blocked or severely reduced, and strikes someone every 43 seconds. Symptoms can vary, but common signs are tightness, pain or a burning Read more

Taking care of gastrointestinal disorders

Woman holding her hands in front of her stomach Over the last 20 years rates of GORD (gastro-oesophageal reflux disease) and IBD (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) have increased, as well as “functional” gastrointestinal conditions, such as IBS (Inflammatory Bowel Disease), which are responsible for more than one third of digestive problems. However, research shows that the need for surgery has reduced with the development of inflammatory medication and with better controlling of H.pylori infections the prevalence of peptic ulcers has decreased. Heartburn is on the rise in many countries. People resort to self-treatment for heartburn by using Proton pump inhibitors, which are extremely safe to use, with a low risk of Read more

Self-test strip detects cancer

person with drop of blood on finger

We live in a world where people are becoming increasingly independent, and this even extends to our health. We monitor our own blood pressure and blood sugar levels, and buy pregnancy tests that we can do at home. Wouldn’t it be great if it was just as easy to test ourselves for diseases like cancer? It seems that this might be possible in the near future…

Researchers at the Ohio State University are developing paper strips that detect various diseases. Each strip costs just 50 cents and they are ideal for regular check-ups. The paper test was first developed as a cheap way to detect malaria in rural Africa and Southeast Asia, where hundreds of people die from the disease. The researchers found that the test results were still accurate, even one month after testing; making it a great solution for people who live further afield or for those who aren’t able to have a face to face visit with their doctor. The researchers stated in the “Journal Read more