Eat your water

Water being poured into water on a blue background

Medical professionals recommend drinking at least 8 glasses of water a day but what some don’t know is that around 20% of our daily hydration intake comes from our solid food. This is good news for those that don’t enjoy drinking water!

Summer is in full force and with raising temperatures around the world it is even more important to ensure that we are keeping our H20 intake in check! Best Doctors and Health.com highlight some of the most hydrating foods to help keep us fresh and hydrated. The negative effects of not keeping your body hydrated can seriously affect your heath and quality of life. Individuals who don’t ingest enough water (be it through liquid or solids) can begin to experience chronic fatigue, constipation, digestive issues, weight gain and even stomach ulcers[1]. An astonishing 60% of our body weight comes from water[2] but Read more

Helping toddlers stay healthy by Professor Berthold Koletzko, MD

little boy eating with a huge, happy smile

Nutrition and physical activity are important for a child’s health and well-being. A balanced family diet can generally cover a toddler’s particular nutritional needs.

However, recent surveys indicate that toddlers throughout Europe are often not receiving a sufficient amounts of nutrients, in particular with respect to vitamin D, iron, omega-3 fatty acids, and, in some countries, iodine. It is therefore important that parents keep the following guidelines to hand when planning their child’s diet: Generous amounts of fluids, preferably water or other unsweetened/sugar-free drinks Generous amounts of plant-based foods such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains and potatoes Moderate amounts of animal-based foods such as milk, meat, fish and eggs Limited amounts only of sugar, sweets, salt, saturated fats, and processed snack foods Some children may Read more

40% of the global adult population has high blood pressure: do you?

Cartoon icon of a hand holding pressure gauge that measures blood pressure

High blood pressure, called hypertension, has become increasingly common. According to the World Health Organisation, raised blood pressure is estimated to cause 7.5 million deaths, about 12.8% of the total of all deaths worldwide[1]. The WHO explains that around 40% of the global population above the age of 25 has raised blood pressure[2].

It’s a dangerous condition, even more so because it’s often symptomless. Blood pressure is the force of the blood pushing against the vessels as it flows throughout the body. If it’s consistently too high, it can damage them and the circulatory system as a whole. Called the “silent killer,” it leads to strokes, vision loss, heart attacks, heart failure or kidney disease if it’s not managed well. Understanding blood pressure readings The only way to know if you have high blood pressure it to get it checked. If your doctor does find elevated rates, it’s important to monitor your numbers. Many pharmacies Read more