Get moving to lower your risk of chronic disease

Running on a lake

Beyond the well-known benefits of weight management and helping maintain strength, balance, and flexibility, regular exercise can also help reduce the occurrence of a host of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, breast cancer, and heart disease.

One study found that regular physical activity was associated with a risk reduction of 75% for breast cancer, 49% for cardiovascular and heart disease, 35% for diabetes, and 22% for colorectal cancer.[1] For people already suffering from a chronic condition, it’s also important to work up a sweat a few times a week because regular physical activity helps manage symptoms and improves overall health. Here’s how exercise can help in the prevention and management of some of the most common chronic conditions. Diabetes Research has shown that consistent physical activity, along with other healthy lifestyle habits (such as maintaining a healthful diet) can help Read more

ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE: ONE OF THE GREATEST THREATS TO GLOBAL HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Antibiotics and a glass of water

Antibiotics are a miracle of modern medicine, contributing to the control of infectious diseases and saving countless lives.

But too much of a good thing has led to a global problem. The misuse of these drugs by health workers and patients has accelerated the pace of antibiotic resistance, one of the greatest threats to global health and development.

Patients and those working within the healthcare industry need to work together to contain this growing problem. For health professionals, this means being judicious when it comes to prescribing and dispensing antibiotics. For individuals, this means helping to prevent infection through a variety of measures (such as vaccinations and regular hand washing) while being responsible about the use of antibiotics. The repercussions of antibiotic resistance are wide-ranging— a decreased ability to treat infection and illnesses in people, animals and plants can lead to increased illness and death, increased cost and length of treatments, and increased side effects from the use of Read more

2018: The year your New Year resolutions actually stick!

Make your New Year resolutions a success

2017 has been a big one for many of us and like every year, we have the opportunity to say goodbye to an era and welcome the exciting things to come in 2018.

New Year’s Eve is a night to celebrate, drink too many bubbles, revel in the successes from the past 12 months, and cheers to saying so-long to those heavier, drearier 2017 memories and events. Along with the symbolic nature of “in with the new and out with the old” the 31st of December has, it is also a time to set new goals for the future. From Best Doctors we want to wish you an incredible New Year and help make your goals happen! A recent study conducted by the University of Scranton found that the associating a new goal to a Read more