Hepatitis: A Global Threat

Medical case file with the hepatitis written on it

Last week the World Health Organisation commemorated the 400 million people around the world that are affected by viral hepatitis.

Every 28th of July World Hepatitis Day is celebrated to raise awareness and insight policy-makers to increase access to testing and treatment. Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver that can serious debilitate quality of life if the virus progresses to fibrosis, cirrhosis or liver cancer. There are 5 main types of viruses: A, B, C, D and E. The most life threatening are B and C as they are the most likely to develop into liver cirrhosis and cancer. Hepatitis B, C, and D are most likely contracted via parenteral contact with body fluids that have been infected. Hepatitis A Read more

World Blood Donor Day 2017

Graphic of two hands sharing a drop of blood
  • 108 million blood donations are collected globally, half of these are in high-income countries.
  • Blood donation by 1% of the population can meet a nation’s most basic requirements for blood.
  • 62 countries collect 100% of their blood supply from voluntary, unpaid blood donors.
Tomorrow we celebrate World Blood Donor Day to commemorate the millions of lives saved thanks to the solidarity of those who share their blood to help another. In a world that is in a constant state of volatility, the World Health Organisation has chosen to focus this year’s event on preparing to be able to provide sufficient blood during emergencies. Millions of people are affected by emergencies every year including natural disasters, disease epidemics, road accidents and armed conflicts. “In the last decade, disasters have caused more than 1 million deaths, with more than 250 million people being affected by emergencies Read more

World Health Day 2017: Depression, Let’s Talk

The dark cloud of depression

On the 7th of April of every year the World Health Organisation (WHO) sponsors and promotes global awareness of a specific health issue and has been successfully doing so for the past 67 years. This special day also serves to commemorate the day this incredibly influential organisation was founded and to celebrate the success of their efforts since they began promoting well-being, preventative care and health in 1950.

The theme surrounding this day varies every year, from diabetes (2016), to food safety (2015) to healthy ageing (2012)[1]. This year, the organisation has chosen to shine light on one of the more taboo areas of health care – depression. WHO characterises depression as “a persistent loss of interest in activities that one normally enjoys, accompanied by an inability to carry out daily activities, for at least two weeks.” In addition, common symptoms also include: a loss of energy, a change in appetite, sleeping more or less, anxiety, reduced concentration, indecisiveness, restlessness, feelings of worthlessness, guilt, or hopelessness and thoughts of Read more