Best Doctors: A focus on CVDs and World Heart Day

Digital heart in the middle of a cardiograph

This coming 29th of September communities around the world will come together to celebrate World Heart Day. This international health day began in 2012 when world leaders united in a global effort to reduce mortality caused by non-communicable diseases (NCDs) of which cardiovascular disease (CVD) account for almost half of deaths, making CVD the world’s number one killer.

The World Health Federation highlights that CVD is the world’s leading cause of death, affecting 17.5 million people a year[1]. This represents for one third of all annual deaths on the planet. “Heart health is at the heart of all health” – World Heart Federation 80% of deaths caused by CVD occur in areas of the world with low or medium incomes[2] that do not have the financial resources to raise awareness about heart health or the medical means to handle the CVD burden in their population. The Best Doctors team strives to also contribute to helping individuals learn about lifestyle choices and Read more

Prenatal Multivitamins: really beneficial or marketer trap?

Pregnant woman holding an orange and a strip of pills

The fact that vitamins and minerals are an important part of our diet isn’t anything new. Particularly for pregnant woman, vitamins and minerals can be very beneficial. But is it necessary to spend all that money on multivitamins, or is that just what marketers would like us to do?

During pregnancy, women will do their very best to ensure that their babies receive all of the nutrients that they need to ensure that they grow and develop as expected and are born healthy and happy. This makes them easy prey for marketers that claim expensive multivitamins are what we need during pregnancy. But studies reveal that not all vitamins are as essential as we might expect. In the journal “Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin”, UK researchers published a report in which they stated that they didn’t find any evidence that pregnant women should any take prenatal multi-nutrient supplements, other than folic Read more

Tick saliva could help keep hearts healthier in people with HIV

HIV Blood Testing

HIV research and treatments have evolved leaps and bounds in the past decades but researchers continue to dedicate time and resources to helping increase both quality of life and life expectancy for those who contract the virus. Researchers have recently developed an experimental drug derived from deer tick salvia that could significantly decrease inflammation and reduce the risk of heart disease.

Individuals with HIV develop a higher risk of both neurological and cardiovascular medical issues because the immunodeficiency virus causes higher levels of monocytes, a type of white blood cell. These cells directly influence the “tissue factor” (TF) protein, which triggers blood clotting and dangerous inflammation – even when an individual is controlling their HIV virus rigorously by antiretrovirals. The scientists have developed an experimental drug called Ixolaris which contains extracts from saliva of a type of ticks found on deer. It was first tested on monkeys who had been infected with SIV, the primate equivalent of human HIV virus. They discovered Read more