Taking care of gastrointestinal disorders

Woman holding her hands in front of her stomach Over the last 20 years rates of GORD (gastro-oesophageal reflux disease) and IBD (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) have increased, as well as “functional” gastrointestinal conditions, such as IBS (Inflammatory Bowel Disease), which are responsible for more than one third of digestive problems. However, research shows that the need for surgery has reduced with the development of inflammatory medication and with better controlling of H.pylori infections the prevalence of peptic ulcers has decreased. Heartburn is on the rise in many countries. People resort to self-treatment for heartburn by using Proton pump inhibitors, which are extremely safe to use, with a low risk of Read more

“For cancer cases, a Second Medical Opinion can be life-saving”

An overhead, close-up shot of doctors standing in a circle, their outstretched hands overlapping together in the centre

A specialist in paediatric immunology, oncology, haematology and bone marrow transplantation at Wrocław Medical University, Prof. Krzysztof Kałwak heads the paediatric transplant unit, the largest facility for paediatric haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Poland and one of the largest paediatric transplant units in all of Europe. Prof. Kałwak’s research and guidelines have been published widely throughout Poland and abroad and he is the National Coordinator for two paediatric illnesses, chronic myeloid leukaemia and congenital neurotropenia. Prof. Kałwak is a Medical Advisor to Best Doctors.

An Interview with Prof. Krzysztof Kalwak Second Medical Opinions are a natural part of the diagnostic process, with doctors regularly consulting other doctors about their cases. How does having access to international experts improve on this practice? A Second Medical Opinion from abroad can be hugely influential in ensuring that the local treating team arrives at the correct diagnosis, including carrying out testing to confirm or rule out the original diagnosis. It can also provide advice on the most appropriate, most effective and least toxic treatments based on the latest innovations and findings. Why is this especially vital for cancer cases? The longer Read more

Living longer, but in better health

For centuries, the challenge facing human beings, and therefore medicine, has been to extend our life expectancy. Some studies carried out in recent decades remind us that the more years we live, the more the economic cost to healthcare systems increases.

On top of all this, the rate of diagnostic error has reached significant numbers in many advanced countries. We must keep in mind that these types of errors (still all too common) end up affecting, one way or another, not only the doctor-patient relationship, but also the level of spending of individual governments and administrations.

By way of an example, in the U.S., the rate of diagnostic error is currently, according to some published studies, between 15% and 28% of all cases. It is a situation, which particularly affects patients with multiple chronic conditions. The key question is how to reduce the number of diagnostic errors In view of this scenario, which obviously affects us all, we should ask ourselves what we can do to solve the problem from all angles: medical professionals, the government and institutions and, of course, from the side of the patients. In order to start to amend the problem, we, as patients, should Read more