Feeding the Heart

Feeding the heart

At Best Doctors we go to great lengths to promote correct diagnosis, treatment plans and prevention. We help analyse medical cases and give second opinions to thousands of patients every year all over the world, many whom are suffering from critical diseases including cardiovascular related medical issues.

Our experts bring such an incredible amount of experience and case analysis to the second medical opinion process and currently 10% of cardiovascular cases review result with a change of diagnosis and a staggering 33% of cases are recommended a change in treatment plan[1]. The first heart cells begin to beat when a foetus is as young as 4 weeks old and this organ continues to develop into one that will play a vital role in our quality of life.  During a lifetime the average heart will beat 3 billion times and will pump an average of 3.8 million litres of Read more

“With a heart attack, there is no reverse gear”

red cogwheels of different sizes forming a heart shape

Head of Cardiology at Ramón y Cajal Hospital in Madrid, member of the European Society of Cardiology and Scientific Advisor to Best Doctors, Prof. José Luis Zamorano tells us …about the latest advances in the field, the importance of technology, the increasing presence of healthcare services in our daily lives and the use of “smart” drugs programmed to work directly on a specific target.

An interview with Prof. José Luis Zamorano Is the heart forever doomed to be a leading cause of death? Are humans just designed that way? Heart conditions are responsible for 35% of deaths around the world, which means 1 out of every 3 people. We know the heart well enough in order to be able to better prevent cardiovascular diseases. There is room for improvement and we need to act on that. So since it is one of the main causes of death, shouldn’t heart conditions be one of the fundamental research objectives for all countries? Research hasn’t stopped. What is more, it is Read more

A printer that can save lives

First used in the 1980s for car manufacturing prototypes, 3D printing has grown to have a significant impact on medicine today, where it can provide solutions for complex or high-risk situations.

How do doctors use 3D printers? After taking a scan, such as a CT or an MRI, of a particular area, a specialised computer graphics programme uses these results to create the exact dimensions for of the same area. These are sent to a 3D printer, which outputs the replica, in a variety of biocompatible materials. When a delicate touch is needed From Michigan, USA, where researchers printed a splint to hold open a section of a baby’s airway[i], to Hangzhou, China, where a 21 year old man with a rare spinal tumour was fitted with a custom-designed prosthesis to reinforce damaged vertebrae[ii], Read more