28th of April: Annual World Day for Safety and Health at Work

Official poster, highlighting the importance of data collection to ensure safety at work

This coming Friday, 28th of April marks the 14th annual celebration of World Day for Safety and Health at Work, powered by the International Labour Organisation. The objective of this day is to promote the prevention of work-related accidents and diseases on a global scale.

“It is an awareness-raising campaign intended to focus international attention on emerging trends in the field of occupational safety and health and on the magnitude of work-related injuries, diseases and fatalities worldwide.” - International Labour Organisation (ILO)[1] Key stakeholders around the world take part in activities to help ignite the conversation surrounding improving preventive measures in the work-place. National authorities, trade unions, employers' organisations and safety and health practitioners have been encouraged by the ILO to recognise their role and responsibility in promoting safe practices in the work-place. Every year the world day focuses its efforts on bringing awareness to a specific Read more

Hard at work in the fight against cancer

a close-up of worried looking office worker scratching the back of his head

When we think of the reasons for employee absenteeism, we often think of back pain, wrist strain or stress leave. Yet while musculoskeletal (MSK) and anxiety-related conditions account for a significant proportion of absences, we tend to forget the heavy toll that cancer takes on the workplace.

According to the New Zealand government, work-related diseases are responsible for an estimated 516 to 804 lives lost per year and as many as 20,000 new disease occurrences. Of these, work-related cancer plays a considerable role[i]. In addition, cancer carries a significant economic burden with far-reaching implications. One UK estimate puts yearly cancer costs at £5.5 billion in lost productivity due to the time off needed for both patients and their caregivers[ii]. Moreover, new findings[iii] reveal that nearly one third of employee long-term illness claims in the UK over a one-year period between August 2014 and July 2015 were due Read more

A vision of the future

a graphic design showing a yellow light bulb with an eye inside it, on a light turquoise background

When technology and medicine meet, the results can bring countless benefits for millions of people around the world, from patients to doctors, from companies to insurers. Today’s post features two devices, which will soon be making their market debut.

A closer look at our health Those smart new glasses your colleague is wearing might actually be smarter than you think. VSP Global, a US based non-profit eye care company has come up with a new health wearable that is visionary in every sense of the word. With frames crafted by designer eyewear maker Dragon Alliance, the new health-tracking glasses contain sensors with similar functions to a wrist-worn fitness tracker, such as monitoring steps taken, calories burned and distance travelled. The glasses can be synced via Bluetooth to an app for real time activity tracking. Although the glasses will first be tested on Read more