New findings on breast cancer treatment spark medical debate

a pair of pink boxing gloves against a grey background

Stage 0 breast cancer, also known as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is considered a very early stage of breast cancer, in which cancer cells are confined to the milk ducts only. The incidence of DCIS has seen a dramatic increase in an era when technological advances make it possible to detect abnormalities that might have gone unnoticed in the past.

The vast majority of women with Stage 0 cancers undergo either a lumpectomy (tumour removal without removing the breast) or a mastectomy (removal of the entire breast). Especially in the case of a mastectomy, surgery can have far-reaching consequences for women beyond treatment, including scarring, disfigurement and complications such as lymphedema (swelling of the lymph nodes). The scars can also be emotional and psychological, affecting a woman’s relationships and self-esteem. Finally, a woman’s working life and career prospects may be adversely affected. It is therefore not surprising that a recently published study has made headlines[i] suggesting that treatment might not have Read more

“With a heart attack, there is no reverse gear”

red cogwheels of different sizes forming a heart shape

Head of Cardiology at Ramón y Cajal Hospital in Madrid, member of the European Society of Cardiology and Scientific Advisor to Best Doctors, Prof. José Luis Zamorano tells us …about the latest advances in the field, the importance of technology, the increasing presence of healthcare services in our daily lives and the use of “smart” drugs programmed to work directly on a specific target.

An interview with Prof. José Luis Zamorano Is the heart forever doomed to be a leading cause of death? Are humans just designed that way? Heart conditions are responsible for 35% of deaths around the world, which means 1 out of every 3 people. We know the heart well enough in order to be able to better prevent cardiovascular diseases. There is room for improvement and we need to act on that. So since it is one of the main causes of death, shouldn’t heart conditions be one of the fundamental research objectives for all countries? Research hasn’t stopped. What is more, it is Read more

Slow and steady wins the race: an interview with Dr John Mayhew

a young woman jogging, followed in the distance by a young man

Best Doctors asks renowned sports medicine specialist Dr John Mayhew for key advice that everyone should keep in mind before heading out on the road or the treadmill. Whether you are a seasoned athlete or just getting started with a new sport, read on for insight on how you can lessen your risk of injury and reap the greatest fitness benefits.

Dr John Mayhew is an Auckland-based consultant in Sports Medicine who has served as advisor and consultant for a number of New Zealand sports associations and teams, including New Zealand Rugby and New Zealand Squash. Chairman of the Australia and New Zealand Insurance Medical Association, he is currently team doctor for the New Zealand Warriors of the National Rugby League and is the former team doctor and chief medical advisor for the All Blacks, New Zealand’s national rugby team. For how long has jogging been a popular exercise option, in your opinion? Is it something that has only recently become popular? Regular Read more