ADHD: BOYS VS. GIRLS

Kids having fun and posing for a picture

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, also known as ADHD, is one of the most common conditions to manifest amongst kids. While this chronic mental disorder causes disruptive behavior and problems focusing for both genders, there are significant differences in the symptoms between boys and girls.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, boys are three times more likely to receive an ADHD diagnosis than girls. This is not because this condition is more common among boys, but because the symptoms of ADHD appear rather differently in girls making it harder to diagnose correctly. Very often, young females will only show subtle symptoms that can be very difficult for medical professionals to pick up on. According to the NHS, ADHD affects up to five per cent of the children. Common signs of this condition among children often include inability to concentrate, extreme amounts of energy Read more

World Mental Health Day: Why it’s important for employers to support mental health

Mental health

On the 10th of October countries around the world will come together to support the efforts of World Mental Health day.

Mental illness remains among the most stigmatized of health conditions. According to the World Health Organisation, 1 in 4 people in the world will be affected by a mental or neurological disorder during their lifetime. There are currently 450 million people worldwide suffering from a mental health condition, making mental health one of the leading causes of global disability. More than 33% of countries worldwide allocated less than an astounding 1% of their total health budget to mental health. In addition, another 33% of countries only allocate a total of 1% of their budget to health of the mind. Despite these Read more

World Health Day 2017: Depression, Let’s Talk

The dark cloud of depression

On the 7th of April of every year the World Health Organisation (WHO) sponsors and promotes global awareness of a specific health issue and has been successfully doing so for the past 67 years. This special day also serves to commemorate the day this incredibly influential organisation was founded and to celebrate the success of their efforts since they began promoting well-being, preventative care and health in 1950.

The theme surrounding this day varies every year, from diabetes (2016), to food safety (2015) to healthy ageing (2012)[1]. This year, the organisation has chosen to shine light on one of the more taboo areas of health care – depression. WHO characterises depression as “a persistent loss of interest in activities that one normally enjoys, accompanied by an inability to carry out daily activities, for at least two weeks.” In addition, common symptoms also include: a loss of energy, a change in appetite, sleeping more or less, anxiety, reduced concentration, indecisiveness, restlessness, feelings of worthlessness, guilt, or hopelessness and thoughts of Read more