Paediatric respiratory physiotherapy

Spring is right around the corner and with it come allergies, colds, bronchiolitis, coughs and runny noses. In children up to two years of age, and especially those between three and six months, this may be a greater problem. See how physiotherapy can help.

Due to their weaker abdominal muscles, which do not permit a strong and effective cough, it is more difficult for babies to expel secretions that may accumulate in the throat and lungs. Depending on the medical condition, mucus may originate in the nose and travel down the throat into the lungs. If not directly secreted by the lungs, it can stagnate and may lead to respiratory infection or distress if left untreated. For parents new to such a situation, it might be a little frightening, especially when babies lose their appetite or if their sleeping patterns become altered. Fortunately, respiratory physiotherapy can easily Read more

A phone call that can ease the pain

Musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries are a major burden for New Zealand. Telephone clinical support offers relief for patients, national health systems, employers and insurers.

Musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders are the second highest cause of disability worldwide[i]. In New Zealand, one quarter of adults suffer from an MSK disorder, and they are the leading cause of disability, consuming at least 25% of the country’s annual health costs.[ii] Indeed, a worldwide study found that up to 80% of people suffer from back pain in their lifetime, and 50% of the working population is afflicted by incapacitating back pain at least once a year[iii]. Mobile solutions for an immobile population The demand for face to face MSK consultations has grown and is further increased by a society which is getting Read more

Physiotherapy in Women’s Health

In this month’s physiotherapy post we look at special conditions affecting women and how physiotherapy can help in both prevention, treatment and recovery.

Physiotherapy in Women's Health refers to the therapeutic treatment of all dysfunctions affecting the pelvis and pelvic floor. Pelvic Floor: a complex structure composed of a group of muscles that support the pelvic organs and form the uterine canal and a passage for urine and feces. These muscles not only need to contract in order to keep a woman continent, but they also need to relax to allow for the passage of urine and bowel movements, natural birth and sexual relations. Problems with the pelvic floor may arise when its muscles are either very weak (hypotonia) or very tense (hypertonia). A combination of Read more