Medical Breakthrough: First gene-editing in human

Chromosomes on blue background, scientific concept 3d illustration

Brian Madeux, 44, from Arizona, USA has been dealing with Hunter syndrome his entire life. He never expected to live past his early 20s and although he has surpassed his life expectancy, he experiences pain every second of the day.

A team of pioneering doctors in California proposed that Brian partake in an experimental trial that could change medical history forever. Brian was recently infused with the first gene-editing therapy directly in his bloodstream at Oakland's UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital. The Mayo Clinic classifies Hunter syndrome as “a very rare, inherited genetic disorder caused by a missing or malfunctioning enzyme. Because the body doesn't have enough of the enzyme to break down certain complex molecules, the molecules build up in harmful amounts. In Hunter syndrome, the buildup of massive amounts of these harmful substances eventually causes permanent, progressive damage affecting appearance, Read more

Parkinson’s Research Advancing in Japan

Parkinson’s disease research

An innovative team of Japanese scientists have been leading a trial in monkeys aimed at restoring their damaged nerve cells. The cells are damaged in a similar way to that caused to human cells that are exposed to Parkinson’s disease.

When Parkinson’s disease onsets; a progressive loss of the nerve cells that are responsible for releasing dopamine will occur. Dopamine is vital as it helps human’s control their body movements. The group of researchers select macaque monkeys to conduct the experiment. It began with triggering a nerve cell loss mimicking that that occurs in a human body with Parkinson’s disease. They then used human stem cells to try and trigger the replacement of the cells lost in the macaque monkeys’ bodies. The monkeys had precursor dopamine neurons derived from human stem cells transplanted into their brains and after two years, showed a Read more

Can coffee help us live longer?

Coffee cup on a wooden surface surrounded by coffee beans

Many could be surprised to learn that a new study conducted in the United Kingdom presents findings that indicate that coffee could elongate our lives. After studying the health of half a million people from 10 European countries, data suggests that drinking three cups of coffee a day may increase our lifespan.

The study was led by researchers from the International Agency for Research on Cancer in conjunction with Imperial College London. They selected an enormous group of people all over the age of 35 and when the study began they recorded how much coffee they drank a day. The state of health at the time of death was then analysed over 16 years. Their conclusions claim that caffeine could be linked to helping lower the risk of death and the development of health complications such as heart diseases and gut related problems. Although researches are keen to highlight that although the pool of Read more