Self-test strip detects cancer

person with drop of blood on finger

We live in a world where people are becoming increasingly independent, and this even extends to our health. We monitor our own blood pressure and blood sugar levels, and buy pregnancy tests that we can do at home. Wouldn’t it be great if it was just as easy to test ourselves for diseases like cancer? It seems that this might be possible in the near future…

Researchers at the Ohio State University are developing paper strips that detect various diseases. Each strip costs just 50 cents and they are ideal for regular check-ups. The paper test was first developed as a cheap way to detect malaria in rural Africa and Southeast Asia, where hundreds of people die from the disease. The researchers found that the test results were still accurate, even one month after testing; making it a great solution for people who live further afield or for those who aren’t able to have a face to face visit with their doctor. The researchers stated in the “Journal Read more

Greater precision, less risk for brain surgery

close up of a male and female doctor, both wearing blue gowns, caps and surgical masks, as they perform surgery

Every year over 250,000 people around the world are diagnosed with brain cancer, and 71% of deaths from brain tumours occur in people under 75 years old. In fact, brain tumours claim more lives of people under 40 than any other cancer, including in children. In addition, brain tumours are extremely difficult to diagnose, and their incidence is rising, with as many as 40% of cancers eventually spread to the brain.[i]

Brain tumour surgery is a highly complex, delicate and risky procedure. Yet a new procedure carried out by a team of surgeons in London may prove to be a game-changer for both patients and doctors alike.

Using both a laser probe and a so-called “smart knife”, surgeons successfully removed a brain tumour from twenty-two year old Ruben Hill, the first patient on which the new procedure was used. The trial operation’s success was recently published in Medical News Today[ii], which notes that the new procedure was able to get around two major challenges facing surgeons performing brain tumour surgery. A laser that can see and a knife that can think One major problem that surgeons encounter while performing brain tumour surgery is the difficulty in distinguishing tumour and healthy brain tissue. Current procedures can only do this by Read more