Get moving to lower your risk of chronic disease

Running on a lake

Beyond the well-known benefits of weight management and helping maintain strength, balance, and flexibility, regular exercise can also help reduce the occurrence of a host of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, breast cancer, and heart disease.

One study found that regular physical activity was associated with a risk reduction of 75% for breast cancer, 49% for cardiovascular and heart disease, 35% for diabetes, and 22% for colorectal cancer.[1] For people already suffering from a chronic condition, it’s also important to work up a sweat a few times a week because regular physical activity helps manage symptoms and improves overall health. Here’s how exercise can help in the prevention and management of some of the most common chronic conditions. Diabetes Research has shown that consistent physical activity, along with other healthy lifestyle habits (such as maintaining a healthful diet) can help Read more

2018: The year your New Year resolutions actually stick!

Make your New Year resolutions a success

2017 has been a big one for many of us and like every year, we have the opportunity to say goodbye to an era and welcome the exciting things to come in 2018.

New Year’s Eve is a night to celebrate, drink too many bubbles, revel in the successes from the past 12 months, and cheers to saying so-long to those heavier, drearier 2017 memories and events. Along with the symbolic nature of “in with the new and out with the old” the 31st of December has, it is also a time to set new goals for the future. From Best Doctors we want to wish you an incredible New Year and help make your goals happen! A recent study conducted by the University of Scranton found that the associating a new goal to a Read more

Breast Cancer Month: Raising Awareness & Trish’s Best Doctors Story

Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2017

Breast cancer remains the most common cancer in women worldwide and as the World Cancer Research Fund International highlights; this accounts for 12% of new cancer diagnosis each year and represents 25% of all cancers that affect females. It is estimated that worldwide over 508,000 women died in 2011 due to breast cancer (Global Health Estimates, WHO 2013).

Breast Cancer around the world The breast cancer incidence rates, measured by the number of cases per 100,000 females, are far lower in developing countries than in the west but death rates are astoundingly higher. The incidence rates greatly range from to 89.7/100,000 in Western Europe to 19.3/100,000 in Eastern Africa. According to GLOBOAN (2008), developing countries have incidence rated below 40/100,000 but survival rates are shockingly lower than other parts of the world like Europe, USA and Japan. North America, Sweden and Japan’s breast cancer survival rates are 80% or higher. This figure drops to 60% in middle-income countries and further Read more