40% of the global adult population has high blood pressure: do you?

Cartoon icon of a hand holding pressure gauge that measures blood pressure

High blood pressure, called hypertension, has become increasingly common. According to the World Health Organisation, raised blood pressure is estimated to cause 7.5 million deaths, about 12.8% of the total of all deaths worldwide[1]. The WHO explains that around 40% of the global population above the age of 25 has raised blood pressure[2].

It’s a dangerous condition, even more so because it’s often symptomless. Blood pressure is the force of the blood pushing against the vessels as it flows throughout the body. If it’s consistently too high, it can damage them and the circulatory system as a whole. Called the “silent killer,” it leads to strokes, vision loss, heart attacks, heart failure or kidney disease if it’s not managed well. Understanding blood pressure readings The only way to know if you have high blood pressure it to get it checked. If your doctor does find elevated rates, it’s important to monitor your numbers. Many pharmacies Read more

World Blood Donor Day 2017

Graphic of two hands sharing a drop of blood
  • 108 million blood donations are collected globally, half of these are in high-income countries.
  • Blood donation by 1% of the population can meet a nation’s most basic requirements for blood.
  • 62 countries collect 100% of their blood supply from voluntary, unpaid blood donors.
Tomorrow we celebrate World Blood Donor Day to commemorate the millions of lives saved thanks to the solidarity of those who share their blood to help another. In a world that is in a constant state of volatility, the World Health Organisation has chosen to focus this year’s event on preparing to be able to provide sufficient blood during emergencies. Millions of people are affected by emergencies every year including natural disasters, disease epidemics, road accidents and armed conflicts. “In the last decade, disasters have caused more than 1 million deaths, with more than 250 million people being affected by emergencies Read more

28th of April: Annual World Day for Safety and Health at Work

Official poster, highlighting the importance of data collection to ensure safety at work

This coming Friday, 28th of April marks the 14th annual celebration of World Day for Safety and Health at Work, powered by the International Labour Organisation. The objective of this day is to promote the prevention of work-related accidents and diseases on a global scale.

“It is an awareness-raising campaign intended to focus international attention on emerging trends in the field of occupational safety and health and on the magnitude of work-related injuries, diseases and fatalities worldwide.” - International Labour Organisation (ILO)[1] Key stakeholders around the world take part in activities to help ignite the conversation surrounding improving preventive measures in the work-place. National authorities, trade unions, employers' organisations and safety and health practitioners have been encouraged by the ILO to recognise their role and responsibility in promoting safe practices in the work-place. Every year the world day focuses its efforts on bringing awareness to a specific Read more