Lung Cancer Awareness Month

Red smoke making the shape of human lungs

The year is coming to an end and with that, festivities, get-togethers and holidays. This, however, does not deter from health organisations year-long efforts to continually raise awareness about crucial issues that need our society’s constant, and sometimes very urgent, attention.

Every November a group of leading international research and advocacy organisations join forces to help drive “The Lung Cancer Awareness Month Coalition”. Their ultimate goal is to help improve outcomes for lung cancer patients on a global scale. As the Coalition explains on their website, lcam.org, “the Coalition seeks to fill this void, inspiring hope and achieving better results for patients in the process. Most of all, the Coalition strives to debunk the unfair assumptions and stigma associated with lung cancer by better educating the public on the disease and its causes.” Lung cancer is the most common cause of death from Read more

Breast Cancer Month: Raising Awareness & Trish’s Best Doctors Story

Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2017

Breast cancer remains the most common cancer in women worldwide and as the World Cancer Research Fund International highlights; this accounts for 12% of new cancer diagnosis each year and represents 25% of all cancers that affect females. It is estimated that worldwide over 508,000 women died in 2011 due to breast cancer (Global Health Estimates, WHO 2013).

Breast Cancer around the world The breast cancer incidence rates, measured by the number of cases per 100,000 females, are far lower in developing countries than in the west but death rates are astoundingly higher. The incidence rates greatly range from to 89.7/100,000 in Western Europe to 19.3/100,000 in Eastern Africa. According to GLOBOAN (2008), developing countries have incidence rated below 40/100,000 but survival rates are shockingly lower than other parts of the world like Europe, USA and Japan. North America, Sweden and Japan’s breast cancer survival rates are 80% or higher. This figure drops to 60% in middle-income countries and further Read more

Tick saliva could help keep hearts healthier in people with HIV

HIV Blood Testing

HIV research and treatments have evolved leaps and bounds in the past decades but researchers continue to dedicate time and resources to helping increase both quality of life and life expectancy for those who contract the virus. Researchers have recently developed an experimental drug derived from deer tick salvia that could significantly decrease inflammation and reduce the risk of heart disease.

Individuals with HIV develop a higher risk of both neurological and cardiovascular medical issues because the immunodeficiency virus causes higher levels of monocytes, a type of white blood cell. These cells directly influence the “tissue factor” (TF) protein, which triggers blood clotting and dangerous inflammation – even when an individual is controlling their HIV virus rigorously by antiretrovirals. The scientists have developed an experimental drug called Ixolaris which contains extracts from saliva of a type of ticks found on deer. It was first tested on monkeys who had been infected with SIV, the primate equivalent of human HIV virus. They discovered Read more