Parkinson’s Research Advancing in Japan

Parkinson’s disease research

An innovative team of Japanese scientists have been leading a trial in monkeys aimed at restoring their damaged nerve cells. The cells are damaged in a similar way to that caused to human cells that are exposed to Parkinson’s disease.

When Parkinson’s disease onsets; a progressive loss of the nerve cells that are responsible for releasing dopamine will occur. Dopamine is vital as it helps human’s control their body movements. The group of researchers select macaque monkeys to conduct the experiment. It began with triggering a nerve cell loss mimicking that that occurs in a human body with Parkinson’s disease. They then used human stem cells to try and trigger the replacement of the cells lost in the macaque monkeys’ bodies. The monkeys had precursor dopamine neurons derived from human stem cells transplanted into their brains and after two years, showed a Read more

Can coffee help us live longer?

Coffee cup on a wooden surface surrounded by coffee beans

Many could be surprised to learn that a new study conducted in the United Kingdom presents findings that indicate that coffee could elongate our lives. After studying the health of half a million people from 10 European countries, data suggests that drinking three cups of coffee a day may increase our lifespan.

The study was led by researchers from the International Agency for Research on Cancer in conjunction with Imperial College London. They selected an enormous group of people all over the age of 35 and when the study began they recorded how much coffee they drank a day. The state of health at the time of death was then analysed over 16 years. Their conclusions claim that caffeine could be linked to helping lower the risk of death and the development of health complications such as heart diseases and gut related problems. Although researches are keen to highlight that although the pool of Read more

3D Printer Produces Functioning Ovaries

Family awaiting a baby

The intricate potential that 3D printing has on their field of medicine continues to evolve and many scientists believe that the possibilities are endless. A recent landmark study has taken 3D printing to a whole new level.

The study was conducted by a team of scientists at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and McCormick School of Engineering. Their intention was to begin exploring possible fertility solutions that could ultimately be used to restore female cancer victims’ ability to conceive if they become sterile as a result of chemotherapy or radiation. The experiment was conducted on female mice and began by removing an ovary from each of them. The scientists used a 3D printer to create bioprosthetic ovaries to replace those who had been previously removed. The man-made ovaries are printed scaffolds that house immature eggs[1] and the Read more