The Benefits of Getting Outdoors

Boy in a field

Summer is almost here, and with it come seasonal barbecues, yard work and outdoor events. And the scientific evidence is growing in favour of getting out into the woods or mountains, the centre of town or even your own back yard. Getting outdoors can be one of the healthiest things you do for both your body and your brain, according to many studies. While, many of the benefits are common knowledge, some of the results may surprise you.

VITAMIN D: “THE SUNSHINE VITAMIN” Statistics show we do not get enough of the “sunshine vitamin,” not only because of long periods indoors, but because Vitamin D doesn’t occur naturally in many foods. Unlike other vitamins, Vitamin D has many disease-fighting properties, protecting against everything from osteoporosis and depression to Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, heart attacks and strokes. The good news is that moderate, controlled time in the sun for short periods of time can give you all the Vitamin D you need. CLEANER AIR Studies have found the concentration of some pollutants is significantly higher indoors – sometimes 100 times higher or more Read more

Comfortable in your own skin, at home and at work

Healthy woman looking peacefully at camera

In order to feel healthy and comfortable in your own skin, it’s of the utmost importance to take good care of yourself. It’s key to eat healthy and to sleep, hydrate and get enough exercise. Another important factor we tend to overlook is peace of mind. Daily stress and uncertainty/insecurity can greatly affect out positivity and peace of mind and can have bad consequences for our health.

Nutrition   In order to eat healthy we have to make we are ingesting all the necessary nutrients that help reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases, colon cancer and type 2 diabetes. A handy tool to refer to is the nutrition circle, which contains the five recommended food groups: Fruits and vegetables Bread, rice, potatoes and pasta Proteins Healthy fats 1.5-2L daily water intake Recommended daily intake: Fruits and vegetables: 250gr vegetables and 2 portions of fruit. Bread, rice, potatoes and pasta: choose wholegrain products, they give us energy and nutrients such as fibre, protein, vitamin B and iron. Proteins: Dairy, meat, fish, eggs, Read more

The Amygdala: The connection between stress and heart disease

Artistic picture of a stethoscope and a foam heart

A recent study conducted by Harvard Medical School and published by UK medical journal The Lancet suggests that the effect of constant stress on a deep-lying region of the brain could potentially explain the link between the risk of heart attack and stress.[1]

Experts and scientific studies coincide that emotional stress can have a serious negative effect on the increase risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Stress affects the body in many ways, one of which being directly affecting the heart and blood vessels. Some experts even believe that emotional stress can be just as dangerous a risk factor as smoking and high blood pressure.[2] Medical professionals have had little understanding until now about the link between stress, the brain and heart disease. However, this recent study, conducted by Harvard Medical School, suggests that the effect stress has on the amygdala section of the brain Read more